History & Lodging at the Cameron Trading Post



Whether you’re looking for somewhere to rest your head for the night or just passing through, the Cameron Trading Post is a must see for anyone on their way to or from the Grand Canyon. From their old rustic decor to their friendly Native American employees, they make anyone feel welcome. 

After the installation of the swayback bridge over the Little Colorado River in 1911, Hubert and C.D. Richardson later established the Cameron Trading post in 1916. Located where Arizona 64 branches off U.S. highway 89, this trading post at the time was only visited by the Hopi and Navajo for bartering. Back in the day it would have typically taken people a couple of days to travel by wagon just to get there, making some even need to stay overnight before heading back to where they had come from.

Those who did stay were always treated like an extension of the family, they made sure their guests were fed and housed. 

 

Native American decor and art, including some of the finest Navajo rugs, Hopi kachinas and Pueblo pottery can all be found for purchase here. But as the years passed and taking note of the amount of people it sees annually, it has managed to manifest itself into a well known lodge with modern amenities.

 

There is a gallery of Native American artifacts, clothing, and jewelry that are located in a historic building where the original trading post was. The main trading post area is more modern and serves as the largest trading post here in Northern Arizona.

As the roads improved and travel through the area increased, the Cameron Trading Post has became a common stop and rest place for all travelers. Only a 30 minute drive from the Grand Canyon entrance, and 28 minutes from Tuba City, it is a pitstop that cannot be missed. It is even a potential stop on our tours departing from Flagstaff, just ask your guide about it! 

 


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